Press "Enter" to skip to content

The Transatlantic Partnership – At a crossroads, once again

EU-Transatlantic relations are at a crossroads. In fact, they have been there time and again in the past four years. And yet, here we are again.

The EU-Transatlantic partnership could build serious momentum in 2020. The upcoming US presidential elections could once again change the course of US foreign policy and set a different direction for future EU-US relations. Or it could lead to an even deeper divide between these two former partners.

Over the past four years, during Donald Trump’s presidency, the decade-old EU-Transatlantic relationship suffered serious setbacks. New, seemingly insurmountable discrepancies between the two global powers emerged.

While EU institutions and the majority of EU governments continued to advocate for liberal democracy, protection of human rights and the rule of law, on the other side of the Atlantic, it seemed that the White House had already written off these values. Instead, nationalism, populism and attack against global institutions are currently “en vogue”.

Stay up to Date – Subscribe to our newsletter.

The Trump Administration set an unprecedented example of how a global power can retreat from multilateralism, praise other leaders who rule with autocratic tendencies while discrediting and raging against the left.

He praised the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union and the work of Hungarian Prime Minister Orbán, who received criticism from various EU leaders for his illiberal, authoritarian way of governing. Trump also pledged to build a border wall and attracted attention for his cruel, inhumane immigration policies – which arguably violate asylum rights. In addition, he criticized NATO, calling it obsolete and questioned whether the EU lives up to its financial obligations to NATO.

If anything, the past four years made it clear that the EU needs to be more self-reliant. With an unreliable partner to the west and an adversary to the east, it became obvious that, in the future, the EU has to act more independently. Also, in terms of military defence. Especially in times of Russian aggression, threats of cyberwar, and hybrid warfare, it is paramount that the block develops the necessary capabilities to defend itself – autonomously.

Moreover, the EU needs to continue upholding and securing basic democratic principles and liberal values – in the EU as well as beyond its own borders. It has to step in to lead as an example when other actors, such as the current Trump administration, obviously cannot.

Whether Biden will be able to secure enough votes to replace Trump in the White House remains questionable. If so, it is still written in the stars whether the Transatlantic partnership can be revived.

If Trump wins the elections in November and stays for another four-year long term, the outlook is rather dark. And not only for the already negatively affected EU-Transatlantic partnership. Also, the prospect for liberal values, the rule of law, and democratic principles is quite sobering.

Four years ago, the EU-US relationship stood at a crossroads. Now, it finds itself in the same state again. So the question remains whether there will be a change for the better. Or if we continue spiralling down the rabbit hole, as we did for the past four years.

 

The New START: Discursive effectiveness but little congruence with what it proposes

The extension of the New START has finally come to a happy ending, where the expectations of many have fallen short after failing to reach broad consensuses on START II and III. However, while it is often presented as a positive development that the world’s nuclear armament has been reduced considerably, it is often simultaneously ignored that the ones that remain are more sophisticated and potentially more destructive.

Viktor Orbán’s racist rhetoric and his propagation of the “great replacement theory”

Hungarian prime minister Viktor Orbán has been known for his racist sentiments for years. However, his most recent remarks during a speech in Băile Tușnad, a town in Romania where Hungarian minorities live, nevertheless sparked outrage due to their outright racist nature. 

The Real Culprit: Globalization as A Cause of Terrorism

In the 21st century, terrorism has been one of the most prominent national and international security and defense problems. While terrorism is a centuries-old issue, it has gained prominence since the massive improvement of technology from the mid-20th century onward and has become a force used by state and non-state actors and poses significant problems for democratic and authoritative regimes alike. In many ways, terrorism and its ability to be conducted anywhere, at any time, has been aided seriously by globalization.

The Breakup of a State: The Balkan Model of the Holocaust

Only a few decades after World War II, the international community largely failed in its role as an intermediary in the war that followed the breakup of Yugoslavia. On the doorstep of the 21st century, new genocides took place in Europe with the ethnic cleansing in Srebrenica, Prijedor, Foca, Bratunac, Sarajevo, as well as all the occupied places and cities under siege in the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The terrible events in Srebrenica left a black shadow on European history. According to the International Committee of the Red Cross, 7.079 Bosnian Muslims were killed in Srebrenica between July 12 and 16, 1995, in what turned out to be the worst genocide in modern Balkan history.

Be First to Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *