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Monisms in International Relations: The Differences and Benefits of Unilateralism and Multilateralism

Bruce Jentleson in his work "American Foreign Policy: The Dynamics of Choice in the 21st Century" defines multilateralism and unilateralism quite clearly. A multilateralist approach differs from a unilateralist approach starkly. However, there are certain aspects of the 21st-century world that assist in fostering such approaches. There are six points that assist in fostering a unilateralist and multilateralist approach; both approaches have been experienced within the new millennium.
 
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Putin, hands off Ukraine

How Eurasianism is Manipulated to Justify the War in Ukraine

The conflict in Ukraine has sparked many debates on several issues, from military and political to ideological ones. There are numerous narratives and theories linked to Putin’s decision to invade Ukraine, this fiercely contested portion of Russia’s near abroad. Among these, there are the discourses centered on Eurasianism, which provide the Russian elites with strong arguments for the invasion, at least on an ideological level.
 
Liberty Plaza, Occupy Wallstreet

Cyber politics: ontology as a disadvantage

We live in an era of transitional cyber politics, a reality where cyber avatars are making politics, while society is lost in solipsist cracks. The 21st century is the time of revolution during the evolution, but where will it take us? This is the greatest challenge of modern society.
 
NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg meets Jake Sullivan, US National Security Advisor

Changing the Playing Field: Non-Traditional Security Threats and the State of International Security

Whenever national security is brought up in public discourse, it is commonly thought of and discussed in stricter terms. Images of military personnel performing combat operations, government-sponsored hackers performing network intrusions, or hypersonic missile launches are among the first images. However, these are only part of the entire national security threats posing nation-states around the globe. Non-traditional security threats pose a real and serious challenge to the Intelligence Community and the U.S. national security strategy as a whole.
 
Ukrainian President Zelenskyy speaks during a UN Security Council meeting

Russian Special Operation: Genocide

It is difficult to be a neighbor of Russia because one fine morning the missiles may fall and the Kremlin's policy will try to convince you that this is a "special operation" and everything is happening for your own good. Occupation of Abkhazia in 1992, the Russian-Georgian war in 2008, the annexation of Crimea in 2014, and the invasion of Ukraine in 2022: This is just a small list of Russia’s crimes in the recent past, disguised as a "special operation". However, unlike in 2008, today the world clearly sees the bloody crimes committed by Russia.
 
The Atomic Bomb Dome in Hiroshima

The Decision to Use Atomic Bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki

While it took less than a second for the atomic bombs on the 6th and 9th of August 1945 to detonate and usher in an age of nuclear fear and paranoia, the decision to drop the bombs took much longer. The ability to destroy an entire city within seconds, wiping out millions of people with the single press of a button, immediately became realized and decades of weapons stockpiling and threats would follow, multiple times stopping just short of bringing the world to destruction. Simply stated, a more diplomatic approach should have been performed to secure America’s moral and ethical standing in the aftermath of the Second World War and in contemporary times.
 
Viktor Orbán, Prime Minister of Hungary

Orbán is performing a balancing act over Russia’s invasion of Ukraine 

Ever since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the Hungarian prime minister Orbán is having a hard time balancing his close relationship with Moscow while at the same time supporting EU measures against Russia and the condemnation of Russian aggression. Even though Hungary did not veto the EU's sanction package on Russia, the country refuses to supply weapons and allow weapons transport through the country. Moreover, the government continues to reiterate that it is important to "keep the peace", without mentioning the aggressor who started this war: Putin.